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4/1/2019 » 4/3/2019
Teaching Prevention 2019



Anti-Racism Policy

Role of Academia in Combatting Structural Racism in the United States

 Anti-Racism Policy [pdf]

Anti-Racism Toolkit


APTR calls upon post-secondary educational institutions in the United States—particularly health professions schools and their academic units that teach prevention and public health—to take action to reduce the impact of racism from within their walls and to assume proactive responsibility for teaching students and the general public about racism’s causes and effects.

APTR Calls Upon ALL Institutions of Post-Secondary Education To:

Develop, improve, and reaffirm comprehensive plans to diversify their campuses.  As many educational programs have demonstrated, legal restrictions on racial quotas do not preclude successful strategies to bring more qualified students into higher education. 

WHEREAS

  • Racism consists of principles and practices that cause and justify an inequitable distribution of rights, opportunities, and experiences across racial groups;
  • Structural racism reflects the macrosocial system of public policies and institutional practices that work in various, often reinforcing, ways to perpetuate racial group inequity;
  • Interpersonal racism reflects microsocial forces of culture expressed through discourse, attitudes, and behaviors that work in various, often reinforcing ways, to perpetuate racial group inequity;
  • We define systematic racism as structural and interpersonal racism operating both separately and together;
  • Significant differences exist between minority groups and non-minority groups in access to adequate housing, quality education, career and employment opportunities, safe neighborhoods, protection from environmental hazards, access to government services, and wealth;
  • These differences in access to opportunity have significant effects on health, quality of life, and length of life and are perpetuated through socio-cultural forces at play over generations;
  • African-Americans, by virtue of their unique history, treatment, and past and present experiences in the United States, have been denied equal access and been disproportionately affected by these differences;
  • Many are indifferent to, or unaware of, the causes and effects of these differences due to a belief that racism no longer operates to a significant degree in the United States but is instead matter of personal prejudice;
  • Economic and social mobility in the United States is now less than in most industrialized and wealthy countries;
  • Post-secondary education in the Unites States is inaccessible to many and therefore supports and perpetuates economic and social immobility;
  • Social justice dictates that each human being has equal worth and should have equal opportunity for social integration, economic and social advancement, and conditions that promote optimal health;
  • Educators, public health professionals, and health professionals can play a vital role in addressing racism, social injustice, human rights violations, and inequality in the educational and health care systems, through teaching, research, policy and practice;

THEREFORE

APTR Calls Upon ALL Institutions of Post-Secondary Education To:

Develop, improve, and reaffirm comprehensive plans to diversify their campuses.  As many educational programs have demonstrated, legal restrictions on racial quotas do not preclude successful strategies to bring more qualified students into higher education.  

Schools and programs should:

  • Proactively seek to recruit, and admit or hire diverse students, faculty and staff to their campuses.
  • Reduce reliance on standardized measures of success that have been shown to be both discriminatory and of limited value in identifying ability and predicting success.
  • Create programs, measures, and systems of accountability to make sure that students from diverse backgrounds feel they belong and have the opportunity to succeed.
  • Develop a systematic approach to assessing and monitoring institutional climate, ensuring that implicit bias and its potential consequences are understood, and that people of diverse backgrounds feel welcome and respected.

Include teaching and research about racism, its causes and effects, as a central part of the teaching mission of the institution. 

Schools and programs should:

  • Provide students with orientation materials and training that prepare them to engage respectfully with others, regardless of background and prior life experience.
  • Create classroom environments where hierarchy and privilege can be identified and challenged and ignorance of barriers to opportunities can be corrected while encouraging and supporting freedom of thought and expression.
  • Provide curricular opportunities, as appropriate, in all academic subjects that expose students to the role of inequity as it relates to the discipline under study.
  • Encourage and support research efforts by faculty directed to better understanding racism, its causes and effects.
  • Promote community education and dialogue about racism, its causes and effects, through a variety of channels.

Health professions schools and programs, including clinical programs and public health programs, should:

  • Incorporate into the curriculum the following elements:
  • Social determinants of health and the unequal distribution of these determinants in relationship to race, ethnicity and other socially defined groups.
  • The place of biology in understanding race and health differences, the limited role of genetics as a primary causal factor in differences in health and disease with particular attention to understanding race as primarily a socially constructed rather than biological system of categorization.
  • Clarity about the concepts of health disparities and health equity, as well as the primary causal roles of human decisions and actions and socially constructed systems in health disparities.
  • Structural differences in access to care and quality of care for minority groups, and particularly for African-Americans, and how these differences lead to health inequities.
  • The historical development and implementation of principles, policies and practices that embedded inequities of care into the U.S. health care system
  • A range of strategies, including clinical quality improvement methods and advocacy, for health professions to address health inequities in their professional role.

APTR Will:

  • Widely disseminate this policy to academic institutions throughout the United States.
  • Encourage and support adoption of these policies by academic institutions throughout the United States.
  • Encourage academic units of public health and prevention to play a leadership role in the adoption and practice of these policies within their academic institutions.
  • Encourage academic units of public health and prevention to conduct research in health inequities, particularly racial inequities.
  • Provide resources for investigating, teaching, and acting against structural racism in academic and health care settings.
  • Provide support for academic units of public health and prevention to increase teaching capacity, conduct research, and advocate regarding health inequities, particularly racial inequities.

To review the complete Anti-Racism Policy >> Click Here

For access to the Anti-Racism Toolkit >> Click Here

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