Program Logo

APTR-AHRQ Preventive Medicine Residency Rotations

About   |   Resident Projects   |   Preceptors   |   How to Apply  

 

US Preventive Services Task Force

The Association for Prevention Teaching and Research (APTR) is offering field placements for preventive medicine residents and primary care residents with the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Program, based at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The clinical preventive medicine rotation at AHRQ gives Preventive Medicine and Primary Care residents an in-depth experience in the process of developing evidence-based recommendations. Residents work closely with AHRQ staff and USPSTF members in a variety of activities: participating in scoping of CPS topics; researching information on epidemiology and burden of preventable conditions addressed by CPS; reviewing and summarizing external comments on draft recommendations; researching positions of other organizations, and; editing and finalizing recommendations and rationale statements. Other projects may involve developing implementation materials for USPSTF recommendations aimed at patients, clinicians, health plans, employers or policy makers. Residents may have the opportunity to participate in a variety of AHRQ meetings, conferences and seminars, including the USPSTF meetings and conference calls with USPSTF members, as well as didactic teaching and journal club sessions focusing on current issues and updates in clinical preventive medicine and evidence-based research.

2018-2019 Residents

Learning Objectives

Preventive Medicine Milestones Addressed by Rotation:

Selected Projects

For current topics, please see the USPSTF website: www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/

Current projects of Preventive Medicine residents include:

About AHRQ

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) is the lead Federal agency charged with improving the safety and quality of America's health care system. AHRQ develops the knowledge, tools, and data needed to improve the health care system and help Americans, health care professionals, and policymakers make informed health decisions. The AHRQ mission is to produce evidence to make health care safer, higher quality, more accessible, equitable, and affordable, and to work within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and with other partners to make sure that the evidence is understood and used.

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Created in 1984, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is an independent, volunteer panel of national experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine. The Task Force works to improve the health of all Americans by making evidence-based recommendations about clinical preventive services such as screenings, counseling on health-related behaviors, and preventive medications. Task Force members come from the fields of preventive medicine and primary care, including internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, behavioral health, obstetrics and gynecology, and nursing. Their recommendations are based on a rigorous review of existing peer-reviewed evidence and are intended to help primary care clinicians and patients decide together whether a preventive service is right for a patient's needs. In addition to making evidence-based recommendation on clinical preventive services, each year, the Task Force also makes a report to Congress that identifies critical evidence gaps in research related to clinical preventive services and recommends priority areas that deserve further examination.

The Task Force works to improve the health of all Americans by making evidence-based recommendations about clinical preventive services such as screenings, counseling services, and preventive medications. All recommendations are published on the Task Force Web site and/or in a peer-reviewed journal. Task Force members come from the fields of preventive medicine and primary care, including internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, behavioral health, obstetrics and gynecology, and nursing. Their recommendations are based on a rigorous review of existing peer-reviewed evidence and are intended to help primary care clinicians and patients decide together whether a preventive service is right for a patient's needs.

Each year, the Task Force makes a report to Congress that identifies critical evidence gaps in research related to clinical preventive services and recommends priority areas that deserve further examination. More information on these reports is available here.